Art journaling ….. Taking doodling further

‘So when you find out lie, after lie, after lie, after lie, keep going……when initiations break you one after another, keep going…’ Naia Leigh

Catt Z’s fast art journaling practice basically involves a process of fast writing on any salient issue, emotion, bodily sensation or pain in a certain space or page, both horizontally and vertically, and then also, writing a prayer or what we are grateful for over that. The next phase involves covering the words by doodling with paints, markers, pens and pencils and any kind of preferred colouring media. Collage can also be applied.The aim is to We try to remain focused while ‘doodling’ to allow further processing to occur and for more insights to arise. It is fast and messy to encourage drawing outside the lines. In the past I had engaged with a similar process, but I had used inspiring quotes or meditations scripts, which I then covered with fast artwork or/ and doodling. These last few days I have been experimenting with Catt Z’s ideas and for these three samples below I have used watercolours, oil crayons and board markers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also, you may enjoy: LEAP for the freedom to SOAR by Naia Leigh at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpC122u2gy4

Plus, an extract from her site https://www.naialeigh.com/wombhealing/

‘In ancient times, women´s spiritual practices were widely accepted and the womb was considered a sacred source of love, intuition, spiritual wisdom, pleasure, and vitality. It was widely revered and worshiped as the source of life. All women today, can still tap into the powerful gifts of their womb, whether or not they have had children, whether they are fertile or post menopausal, and even if they have had their wombs removed. However many women are disconnected from their wombs, know little about them, and hold various pain and trauma that negatively impacts their lives without knowing the origin. These blocks in the womb can create physical dis-ease, unhealthy relationship patterns, creative blocks, or other issues that prevent women from experiencing what they want in life. In our modern cultures, we are socialized to live life from the mind rather than our body wisdom. Our menstrual cycles are seen as burdens, and our wombs are seen as disposable, with hysterectomies and c-sections given out like candy …… Women’s bodies all over the world have been violated and objectified, leaving women with a limited and distorted perspective of their own body and its inherent capabilities. Being disconnected from the womb means we are operating from a portion of our power, creating a portion of what we are capable of, and experiencing partial fulfillment …… Our wombs hold our greatest power as women, and yet can also carry our greatest wounding’.

Continued….

Yesterday I provided a link of a discussion on the body-mind connection, mindfulness and shifts occurring in the area of medical treatment. As I mentioned in this particular episode  of  Insights at the Edge, at http://soundstrue-ha.s3.amazonaws.com/subscriptions/media/PD05862W_Ron-Siegel.mp3,  Dr. Ronald Siegel, an assistant professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School, talks about the psychophysiological component in healing chronic pain and other health problems and symptoms, about a practice he teaches called “Separating the Two Arrows” and how to make friends with fear, stress and anxiety, and also, how the medical profession is currently changing rapidly in its embrace of the practice of mindfulness. He teaches internationally about mind-body treatment and has authored many books including the book Back Sense: A Revolutionary Approach to Halting the Cycle of Chronic Back Pain, and also a co-author of the book Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-based Psychotherapy.

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In a few days it will be the second anniversary of my mother’s passing away and I have of lately been thinking of motherhood, delayed individuation processes and grief processes, and then today, I came across this passage by Thích Nhất Hạnh:

‘The day my mother died I wrote in my journal, “A serious misfortune of my life has arrived.” I suffered for more than one year after the passing away of my mother. But one night, in the highlands of Vietnam, I was sleeping in the hut in my hermitage. I dreamed of my mother. I saw myself sitting with her, and we were having a wonderful talk. She looked young and beautiful, her hair flowing down. It was so pleasant to sit there and talk to her as if she had never died. When I woke up it was about two in the morning, and I felt very strongly that I had never lost my mother. The impression that my mother was still with me was very clear. I understood then that the idea of having lost my mother was just an idea. It was obvious in that moment that my mother is always alive in me.
I opened the door and went outside. The entire hillside was bathed in moonlight. It was a hill covered with tea plants, and my hut was set behind the temple halfway up. Walking slowly in the moonlight through the rows of tea plants, I noticed my mother was still with me. She was the moonlight caressing me as she had done so often, very tender, very sweet… wonderful! Each time my feet touched the earth I knew my mother was there with me. I knew this body was not mine but a living continuation of my mother and my father and my grandparents and great-grandparents. Of all my ancestors. Those feet that I saw as “my” feet were actually “our” feet. Together my mother and I were leaving footprints in the damp soil. From that moment on, the idea that I had lost my mother no longer existed. All I had to do was look at the palm of my hand, feel the breeze on my face or the earth under my feet to remember that my mother is always with me, available at any time’

The personal photos also have to do with motherhood and godparenting. In the first photo I am obviously pregnant. In this second one, my son and I are about to go out to dinner to celebrate our christening a friend’s baby son (2000), and in the third photo my young son is mesmerized by his godfather’s fishing skills…. (1990s).

And finally, a really interesting episode of  Insights at the Edge at http://soundstrue-ha.s3.amazonaws.com/subscriptions/media/PD05862W_Ron-Siegel.mp3, where Dr. Ronald Siegel, an assistant professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School, talks about the psychophysiological component in healing chronic pain and other health problems, about a practice he teaches called “Separating the Two Arrows” and how to make friends with fear, stress and anxiety, and also, how the medical profession is currently changing rapidly in its embrace of the practice of mindfulness. He teaches internationally about mind-body treatment and has authored many books including the book Back Sense: A Revolutionary Approach to Halting the Cycle of Chronic Back Pain, and also a co-author of the book Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-based Psychotherapy.